ORS Tendon Section: The Tendon Times
May 2020

ORS Tendon Section Member Spotlights

This issue's ORS Tendon Section Member Spotlight features the recipients of the 2020 New Investigator Recognition Awards (NIRA), ORS Tendon Section Podium Awards, and ORS Tendon Section Poster Awards

NIRA Recipients

Takayuki Fujii, MD, PhD, Hospital for Special Surgery

Current Title, Department, Employer:
Postdoctoral fellow, Research Institute, Hospital for Special Surgery

Brief Bio:
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA                      2017- present

Graduate school of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan   2013- 2017

Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan                  1999-2005

Who have been your mentors?
Lionel B. Ivashkiv, Scott A. Rodeo, Kyung-Hyun Park-Min, Hiromu Ito, Eiichiro Nishi

What are you currently working on?
Immune response to tissue injury/healing, Bone homeostasis, Immune response to COVID-19.

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
Jeremy Bentham, “the greatest happiness of the greatest number” is my favorite phrase.

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Max Michalski, MD, MS, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center


Current Title, Department, Employer:
Clinical Fellow, Foot and Ankle Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Brief Bio:
Following the completion of my undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering at the University of Wisconsin I stayed in Madison to join the NeuroMuscular Biomechanics Lab. I studied the effect of step rate on running mechanics and creating a gait lab for children with cerebral palsy to earn my Master’s degree. I then began medical school at the University of Wisconsin with the intention to become an orthopaedic surgeon. Between my third and fourth years of medical school, I spent a year in Vail, Colorado as a biomechanics research assistant at the Steadman Philippon Research Institute where I completed multiple anatomy and biomechanical studies of the shoulder, hip, knee and ankle. During residency in orthopaedic surgery at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles I got involved in biomechanical research as an intern and continued throughout my training including a Game Changer presentation at the 2017 AAOS annual meeting. I am currently completing a fellowship in foot and ankle surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

Who have been your mentors?
Bryan Heiderscheit, Robert LaPrade, Glenn Pfeffer, David Thordarson, Melodie Metzger, Christopher Chiodo

What are you currently working on?
I am currently looking at clinical outcomes following surgery for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and recently had a paper accepted for publication as a consensus statement for surgical management of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
Steve Irwin. He was an idol of mine growing up and he unfortunately passed away a couple months before I went to Australia to study abroad.

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Na Rae Park, PhD, University of Pennsylvania


Current Title, Department, Employer:

Postdoctoral Fellow
Mckay Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Laboratory of Dr. Joeng, Kyu Sang

Brief Bio:
Bachelor of Science, 2007
Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea

Doctor of Philosophy, 2015
Department of Biomedical Science, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, South Korea

Postdoctoral fellow, 2018 - Present
Mckay Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, USA (Laboratory of Dr. Joeng, Kyu sang)

Who have been your mentors?
Dr. Kyu Sang Joeng, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Mckay Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, USA

What are you currently working on?
I mainly focus on the function of Rcn3 in postnatal tendon development and homeostasis by using mouse models.

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
Alice H. Huang, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

I interested in molecular mechanisms in tendon healing.


Podium Award Recipients

Katherine T. Best, PhD, University of Rochester

Current Title, Department, Employer:

Research Assistant, Center for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Rochester Medical Center

Brief Bio:
BS in Biochemistry in 2015

SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, NY

PhD in Pathology, 2020
University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY

Who have been your mentors?
Dr. Eric Helms, SUNY Geneseo (2013-2015)

Dr. Alayna Loiselle, University of Rochester Medical Center (2015-2020)

What are you currently working on?
I am currently wrapping up the studies from my dissertation work that focused on two topics: (1) effects of Scleraxis-lineage cell ablation on tendon healing, and (2) effects of Scleraxis-lineage knockdown of canonical NF-κB signaling on fibrotic tendon healing and cell survival.

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
Leonardo da Vinci. He was so diversely talented and influential. Also, I would love to know the identity of the Mona Lisa.

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Keshia Mora, BS, University of Rochester


Current Title, Department, Employer:
MD/PhD Graduate Student, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester

Brief Bio:
I was born and raised in New York City and completed my undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering at Yale University. After graduating, I went on to complete a two-year stint as a post-baccalaureate IRTA fellow at the NIH. I then entered the MD/PhD program at the University of Rochester and became involved in orthopedic research.

Who have been your mentors?
Hemant Tagare was my undergraduate mentor who played a pivotal role in introducing me to the field of biomedical engineering as well as the concept of the physician-scientist. Since then I have been lucky enough to have several amazing mentors, including Mark Buckley and Alayna Loiselle who are my PhD advisor and co-advisor. Both Mark and Alayna have provided invaluable guidance and support and have allowed me the freedom to pursue the research questions of interest to me.

What are you currently working on?
I am currently working on characterizing the micro-mechanical strain environment induced by Achilles tendon impingement.

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
William Faulkner. I am drawn to Faulkner as a compelling storyteller who addresses themes of race and identity head-on.

 

Fabian Passini, MSc, ETH Zurich

Current Title, Department, Employer:
MSc ETH in Biomedical Engineering
Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital Balgrist

Brief Bio:
I grew up in a small but beautiful village in the Swiss alps (Poschiavo). Then, I moved to Zurich to study Human Movement Sciences for my bachelor’s and Biomedical Engineering for my master’s degree at ETH Zurich. In 2016, I started my PhD on tendon biomechanics in the laboratory of Prof. Snedeker.

Who have been your mentors?
Prof. Stephen Ferguson and Prof. Alfonso Gautieri were my mentors and supervisors during my master’s study. Since 2016 I have the privilege to work with Prof. Jess Snedeker, who is my doctoral father. I am also mentored by the neurobiologist Dr. Aiman Saab.

What are you currently working on?
I am studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tendon mechanotransduction processes and their role in tendon physiology.

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
Jesus, to talk about life.

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Poster Award Recipients

Connie Chamberlain, PhD, University of Wisconsin

 

Current Title, Department, Employer:
I currently work full time as an Associate Scientist as in independent researcher in the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I also work part time as a Scientist for Dianomi Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company with emphasis on therapeutic protein delivery.

Brief Bio:
Raised on a farm, in South Central Illinois, I continued down the agricultural related pathway and obtained my BS in Animal Science at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. After completing my degree, I moved to Stillwater, OK and obtained my MS in Reproductive Physiology with a focus on bovine ovarian cell regulation at Oklahoma State University (OSU). I worked as a lab technician at OSU before eventually moving back to the family farm. Realizing farm life was not my passion, I moved to Madison, WI to work in a muscle physiology lab as a Research Specialist with a focus on satellite cell characterization in skeletal muscle at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After the suggestion by my employer, I went back to school at UW-Madison to obtain my MS and PhD in Material Science. My research focus was on the role of macrophages during tendon and ligament healing. I continued my Post-Doc at the UW-Madison for two years after my PhD. Thereafter I transitioned to an independent Scientist at the UW where I continue to work in the Department of Orthopedics with a focus on tendon and ligament healing. I also work part time at Dianomi Therapeutics as a Scientist where we focus on delivering therapeutic proteins using mineral coated microparticles.

Who have been your mentors?
I have had wonderful mentors! Ray Vanderby, PhD was my graduate school advisor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has provided mentorship for the past 15 years. We continue to work together on a number of tendon and ligament healing projects. I worked on my post doc with Bill Murphy, PhD and Geoff Baer MD, PhD where I examined the effects of mineral coated biomaterials to improve orthopedic tissue healing. They continue to be integral in my research development.   

What are you currently working on?
We continue to research tendon and ligament healing. More specifically, we are examining the effects of macrophage therapy on ligament and tendon injury. We are also, studying the effects of exosome therapy as an alternative cell free therapy to improve aspects of healing. We have also started collaborations with Andrea Spiker, MD where we are examining the ability to predict osteoarthritis outcome from tissue remnants obtained from patients undergoing hip arthroscopy to correct for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
I would love to meet Rosalind Franklin and hear her version about the race to discover the structure of the DNA helix between her and James Watson and Francis Crick. I would also ask her what lessons she would suggest for women in scientific research.

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Brianne K. Connizzo, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Current Title, Department, Employer:
Postdoctoral Fellow
Biological Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Brief Bio:
BS in Engineering Science
Smith College, Northampton, MA

PhD in Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Postdoctoral Fellow, Biological Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Who have been your mentors?
I was introduced to tendon biomechanics by a volleyball teammate who worked with Borjana Mikic at Smith College. After some research in her lab and a senior thesis, she encouraged me to pursue a PhD. and directed me towards Lou Soslowsky at Penn. I can’t even begin to describe the impact that Lou has had and will have on my career, but I will be forever grateful to him for guiding me on this path. During my time at Penn, I was also fortunate to work with many others such as David Birk, Sherry Liu, and Rob Mauck who continue to be constant sources of encouragement. Then, through a collaboration I was introduced to Al Grodzinsky, who took me into his cartilage-focused lab and allowed me to do all sorts of tendon research for my postdoctoral studies. Al is not only a fantastic mentor, enthusiastically supporting my science and helping me navigate the faculty search process, but I anticipate that he will be a close colleague and friend for the rest of my career. There are also so many others that enable me to be the scientist I am today in more informal capacities; if I listed them all, it would take the whole newsletter.

What are you currently working on?
Generally speaking, I’m interested in how tendons sense and respond to everyday cues, and what happens when that goes haywire. My particular focus is understanding the normal aging process, and how cellular changes affect the ability of tendons to regulate the extracellular matrix. My current studies center around investigating the response to (1) biochemical cues, as in the case of inflammatory or secondary joint damage, and (2) mechanical cues, as in the case of different modalities and regimes of physiological loading. My laboratory, studying these and other questions in soft tissue mechanobiology, will be opening at Boston University in January 2021 and we are recruiting personnel at all levels – check us out!

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
Generally, I like to focus on the present and the future, but I’d like to meet Galileo. It seems like he would be very relatable to present day scientists since everyone was critical of his findings during that time, and I think it would be fascinating to compare what he thought about the universe with what we now know. I’d also love to see what life was like in 1600's Italy, maybe find a couple of my ancestors along the way.

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Saundra Schlesinger, BS, Oregon Health and Science University

Current Title, Department, Employer:
PhD Candidate
Program in Cell and Developmental Biology in the Department of Medicine 
Oregon Health and Science University

Brief Bio:
Education:

B.S. Genetics/Cell/Developmental Biology in 2010 at Arizona State University
2014-present PhD student in Dr. Ronen Schweitzer’s lab at Oregon Health and Science University studying tendon elongation in development

Research:
2009-2010 Undergraduate research in Dr. Jon Harrison’s lab at Arizona State University studying the effects of hypoxia on fruit fly development
2011-2014 Research Technician in Dr. Peter Chen’s lab at University of Washington studying the effects of Syndecan-1 on lung wound healing, flu, and cancer

Who have been your mentors?

  • Dr. Ronen Schweitzer, my PhD mentor
  • Dr. John Brigande, a dissertation committee member
  • Dr. Jackie Wirz, former assistant dean and head of the OHSU career development center
  • Dr. Peter Chen, research PI
  • Peggy and David Schlesinger, my parents-in-law
  • Dan Brugger, high school English teacher

What are you currently working on?
Currently working on measuring parameters of normal tendon growth and patterns of proliferation and cellular behaviors in the tendon during development. I am also using models of disrupted tendon growth to determine key transcriptional and biomechanical factors driving tendon elongation in development.

If there is one person in history you could meet and chat with, who would it be and why?
Jesus of Nazareth. I’m not religious myself but it’s undeniable the impact Jesus has had on history and the modern world. I would love to meet someone who would have such an incredible impact on the world. What kind of person was he? Was he aware of the impact he was making?

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Recent Tendon Publications

The ORS Tendon Section Membership Committee is excited to share the latest publications from the Section membership community,

Capone G, Svedman S, Juthberg R, Edman G, Ackermann PW. Higher pyruvate levels after Achilles tendon rupture surgery could be used as a prognostic biomarker of an improved patient outcome. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2020 May 6. doi: 10.1007/s00167-020-06037-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Wong CC, Huang YM, Chen CH, Lin FH, Yeh YY, Bai MY. Cytokine and Growth Factor Delivery from Implanted Platelet-Rich Fibrin Enhances Rabbit Achilles Tendon Healing. Int J Mol Sci. 2020 May 2;21(9). pii: E3221. doi: 10.3390/ijms21093221.

Shi Y, Kang X, Wang Y, Bian X, He G, Zhou M, Tang K. Exosomes Derived from Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSCs) Enhance Tendon-Bone Healing by Regulating Macrophage Polarization. Med Sci Monit. 2020 May 5;26:e923328. doi: 10.12659/MSM.923328.

Paredes J, Marvin JC, Vaughn B, Andarawis-Puri N. Innate tissue properties drive improved tendon healing in MRL/MpJ and harness cues that enhance behavior of canonical healing cells. FASEB J. 2020 Apr 29. doi: 10.1096/fj.201902825RR. [Epub ahead of print]

George NG, Bell R, Paredes JJ, Taub PJ, Andarawis-Puri N. Superior mechanical recovery in male and female MRL/MpJ tendons is associated with a unique genetic profile. J Orthop Res. 2020 Apr 30. doi: 10.1002/jor.24705. [Epub ahead of print]

Zhu X, Liu Z, Wu S, Li Y, Xiong H, Zou G, Jin Y, Yang J, You Q, Zhang J, Liu Y. Enhanced tenogenic differentiation and tendon-like tissue formation by Scleraxis overexpression in human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells. J Mol Histol. 2020 Apr 25. doi: 10.1007/s10735-020-09873-w. [Epub ahead of print]

Schoenenberger AD, Tempfer H, Lehner C, Egloff J, Mauracher M, Bird A, Widmer J, Maniura-Weber K, Fucentese SF, Traweger A, Silvan U, Snedeker JG. Macromechanics and polycaprolactone fiber organization drive macrophage polarization and regulate inflammatory activation of tendon in vitro and in vivo. Biomaterials. 2020 Aug;249:120034. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2020.120034. Epub 2020 Apr 11.

Wang D, Pun CCM, Huang S, Tang TCM, Ho KKW, Rothrauff BB, Yung PSH, Blocki AM, Ker EDF, Tuan RS. Tendon-derived extracellular matrix induces mesenchymal stem cell tenogenesis via an integrin/transforming growth factor-β crosstalk-mediated mechanism. FASEB J. 2020 Apr 17. doi: 10.1096/fj.201902377RR. [Epub ahead of print]

Ficklscherer A, Zhang AZ, Beer T, Gülecyüz MF, Klar RM, Safi E, Woiczinski M, Jansson V, Müller PE. The effect of autologous Achilles bursal tissue implants in tendon-to-bone healing of rotator cuff tears in rats. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2020 Apr 13. pii: S1058-2746(20)30115-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2020.01.078. [Epub ahead of print]

Zhang Y, Deng XH, Lebaschi AH, Wada S, Carballo CB, Croen B, Ying L, Rodeo SA.  Expression of alarmins in a murine rotator cuff tendinopathy model. J Orthop Res. 2020 Apr 14. doi: 10.1002/jor.24690. [Epub ahead of print]

Schmidt EC, Hullfish TJ, O'Connor KM, Hast MW, Baxter JR. Ultrasound echogenicity is associated with fatigue-induced failure in a cadaveric Achilles tendon model. J Biomech. 2020 Apr 3:109784. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2020.109784. [Epub ahead of print]

Rajpar I, Barrett JG. Multi-differentiation potential is necessary for optimal tenogenesis of tendon stem cells. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2020 Apr 9;11(1):152. doi: 10.1186/s13287-020-01640-8.

Li M, Chen Y, Hu J, Shi Q, Li X, Zhao C, Chen C, Lu H. Sustained release of collagen-affinity SDF-1α from book-shaped acellular fibrocartilage scaffold enhanced bone-tendon healing in a rabbit model. J Orthop Res. 2020 Apr 10. doi: 10.1002/jor.24687. [Epub ahead of print]

Wang C, Hu Q, Song W, Yu W, He Y. Adipose Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Decrease Fatty Infiltration and Enhance Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rabbit Model of Chronic Tears. Am J Sports Med. 2020 May;48(6):1456-1464. doi: 10.1177/0363546520908847. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Rosario MV, Roberts TJ. Loading Rate Has Little Influence on Tendon Fascicle Mechanics. Front Physiol. 2020 Mar 24;11:255. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2020.00255. eCollection 2020.

Zhang T, Chen Y, Chen C, Li S, Xiao H, Wang L, Hu J, Lu H. Treadmill exercise facilitated rotator cuff healing is coupled with regulating periphery neuropeptides expression in a murine model. J Orthop Res. 2020 Apr 1. doi: 10.1002/jor.24678. [Epub ahead of print]

Ryu K, Saito M, Kurosaka D, Kitasato S, Omori T, Hayashi H, Kayama T, Marumo K. Enhancement of tendon-bone interface healing and graft maturation with cylindrical titanium-web (TW) in a miniature swine anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction model: histological and collagen-based analysis. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2020 Mar 31;21(1):198. doi: 10.1186/s12891-020-03199-0.

Durgam S, Singh B, Cole SL, Brokken MT, Stewart M. Quantitative Assessment of Tendon Hierarchical Structure by Combined Second Harmonic Generation and Immunofluorescence Microscopy. Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2020 May 5. doi: 10.1089/ten.TEC.2020.0032. [Epub ahead of print]

Virk MS, Luo W, Sikes KJ, Li J, Plaas A, Cole BJ. Gene expression profiling of progenitor cells isolated from rat rotator cuff musculotendinous junction. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2020 Mar 28;21(1):194. doi: 10.1186/s12891-020-03190-9.

Taylor BL, Kim DH, Huegel J, Raja HA, Burkholder SJ, Weiss SN, Nuss CA, Soslowsky LJ, Mauck RL, Kuntz AF, Bernstein J. Localized delivery of ibuprofen via a bilayer delivery system (BiLDS) for supraspinatus tendon healing in a rat model. J Orthop Res. 2020 Mar 25. doi: 10.1002/jor.24670. [Epub ahead of print]

Wong CC, Yeh YY, Yang TL, Tsuang YH, Chen CH. Augmentation of Tendon Graft-Bone Tunnel Interface Healing by Use of Bioactive Platelet-Rich Fibrin Scaffolds. Am J Sports Med. 2020 May;48(6):1379-1388. doi: 10.1177/0363546520908849. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

Pan Z, Wu Q, Xie Z, Wu Q, Tan X, Wang X. Upregulation of HSP72 attenuates tendon adhesion by regulating fibroblast proliferation and collagen production via blockade of the STAT3 signaling pathway. Cell Signal. 2020 Jul;71:109606. doi: 10.1016/j.cellsig.2020.109606. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Strenzke M, Alberton P, Aszodi A, Docheva D, Haas E, Kammerlander C, Böcker W, Saller MM. Tenogenic Contribution to Skeletal Muscle Regeneration: The Secretome of Scleraxis Overexpressing Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Myogenic Differentiation In Vitro. Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Mar 13;21(6). pii: E1965. doi: 10.3390/ijms21061965.

Rashid M, Dudhia J, Dakin SG, Snelling SJB, De Godoy R, Mouthuy PA, Smith RKW, Morrey M, Carr AJ. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of cellular response to a woven and electrospun polydioxanone (PDO) and polycaprolactone (PCL) patch for tendon repair. Sci Rep. 2020 Mar 16;10(1):4754. doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-61725-5.

Smith MJ, Bozynski CC, Kuroki K, Cook CR, Stoker AM, Cook JL. Comparison of biologic scaffolds for augmentation of partial rotator cuff tears in a canine model. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2020 Mar 10. pii: S1058-2746(20)30003-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2019.11.028. [Epub ahead of print]

Rak Kwon D, Jung S, Jang J, Park GY, Suk Moon Y, Lee SC. A 3-Dimensional Bioprinted Scaffold With Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improves Regeneration of Chronic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear in a Rabbit Model. Am J Sports Med. 2020 Mar;48(4):947-958. doi: 10.1177/0363546520904022.

KarisAllen JJ, Veres SP. Effect of testing temperature on the nanostructural response of tendon to tensile mechanical overload. J Biomech. 2020 May 7;104:109720. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2020.109720. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Dietrich-Zagonel F, Hammerman M, Eliasson P, Aspenberg P. Response to mechanical loading in rat Achilles tendon healing is influenced by the microbiome. PLoS One. 2020 Mar 10;15(3):e0229908. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0229908. eCollection 2020.

Milewska M, Burdzińska A, Zielniok K, Siennicka K, Struzik S, Zielenkiewicz P, Pączek L. Copper Does Not Induce Tenogenic Differentiation but Promotes Migration and Increases Lysyl Oxidase Activity in Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells. Stem Cells Int. 2020 Feb 20;2020:9123281. doi: 10.1155/2020/9123281. eCollection 2020.

Komura S, Satake T, Goto A, Aoki H, Shibata H, Ito K, Hirakawa A, Yamada Y, Akiyama H. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived tenocyte-like cells promote the regeneration of injured tendons in mice. Sci Rep. 2020 Mar 4;10(1):3992. doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-61063-6.

 All names in bold are ORS Tendon Section members.